A river’s rightful work

aids everyone’s survival by providing

a nutrient channel between land and sea.

Blocking rivers severs community,

manufacturing hunger and thirst.

 

About 58,000* large dams

now provide services for some

while starving land and sea worldwide.

 

Most of the world’s large dams divert

water for irrigation.

Some for electricity. Some both.

 

The United States harbors

approximately 9,000 large dams, trailing

only China's claim to nearly half

the worldwide total in large dams.

 

Four of the United States dams

are located on the lower Snake River**.

 

There exist communally beneficent means

toward the services these dams provide.

 

recommendations***

  • Dams should be last resort for managing water and generating electricity.
  • Build no more dams on river mainstems, which ensure vital freshwater communities. 
  • Heed indigenous voices in the protection of rivers and water management.

 

Many existing large dams

can and should be removed.

 

Just as with building, removing dams

disrupts lives as land and community shift.

No one asked river, salmon, bear, or wolf

about consequences to them when the dams were built.

No one thought to ask. Whatever the temporary

disruption that occurs in the removal of dams,

the immediate socioeconomic consequence

pales to that endured in the longevity of concrete barriers.

 

Humans have created a great deal of unnecessary work for themselves

by restricting and denying rivers’ rightful flow.

 

please see

Assessing the Condition of America's Dams and Rivers

 

*dam numbers from ICOLD / World Dam Registry General Synthesis

**Snake River dams - Get the Truth / Dam $ense & 5.4.2016 ruling / Salmon recovery requires big dam changes

***recommendations from International Rivers / The State of the World's Rivers

 

MORE

Amazon Headwaters Protected! / International Rivers

'downfall of big dams has started and it's beautiful' / Fusion

Removal of Klamath Dams [To] Be Largest River Restoration in U.S. History / KQED

Reservoirs Provide Tap Water Yet Significantly Contribute to Climate Change / KQED

Save Our Wild Salmon for the latest news on the lower Snake River dams and more.

Washington's Big Dam Climate Nightmare / Seattle Weekly

 

photos courtesy Save Our Wild Salmon